Wednesday, August 05, 2020

On My Radar: Anthony Horowitz's Moonflower Murders!



I am a fan of Anthony Horowitz. He's been the mind behind such wonderful television series as Foyle's War, Poirot, and Midsomer Murders, and he's written some excellent books such as The Word Is Murder, The House of Silk, and Magpie Murders. You have to know that I was very happy when I discovered that he's written a follow-up to Magpie Murders which stars London book editor Susan Ryeland and the murder mysteries by Alan Conway featuring Atticus P√ľnd, a half Greek, half German private detective in the 1950s.

Available in the UK on August 20, the US edition of Moonflower Murders will be released on November 10, 2020. Let's find out more about it!


Synopsis:

"Retired publisher Susan Ryeland is living the good life. She is running a small hotel on a Greek island with her long-term boyfriend Andreas. It should be everything she's always wanted. But is it? She's exhausted with the responsibilities of making everything work on an island where nothing ever does, and truth be told she's beginning to miss London.

And then the Trehearnes come to stay. The strange and mysterious story they tell, about an unfortunate murder that took place on the same day and in the same hotel in which their daughter was married—a picturesque inn on the Suffolk coast named Farlingaye Hall—fascinates Susan and piques her editor’s instincts. 

One of her former writers, the late Alan Conway, author of the fictional Magpie Murders, knew the murder victim—an advertising executive named Frank Parris—and once visited Farlingaye Hall. Conway based the third book in his detective series, Atticus Pund Takes the Cake, on that very crime. 

The Trehearne’s, daughter, Cecily, read Conway’s mystery and believed the book proves that the man convicted of Parris’s murder—a Romanian immigrant who was the hotel’s handyman—is innocent. When the Trehearnes reveal that Cecily is now missing, Susan knows that she must return to England and find out what really happened.

Brilliantly clever, relentlessly suspenseful, full of twists that will keep readers guessing with each revelation and clue, Moonflower Murders is a deviously dark take on vintage English crime fiction from one of its greatest masterminds, Anthony Horowitz."


I don't know about you, but Moonflower Murders is firmly planted on my radar, and I'm really looking forward to getting my hands on a copy!


18 comments:

  1. Ooh, sounds good and would go well with tea and "Pund (pound) cake."

    I'll wait for your review, but I'm interested.

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    1. So far, I've liked everything I've read that's written by Horowitz. I like the way his mind works.

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  2. I want to read this very much, too, Cathy. I enjoyed Magpie Murders quite a lot, and I like Horowitz' work in general. Consider my radar activated...

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  3. I'm excited about this one too. Did you hear that Magpie Murders is supposed to have a TV adaptation, maybe by PBS? Sounds good to me, if filming ever begins again for any TV/movie stuff.

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  4. So does Magpie Murders have the same characters? And shoule one read tha tone first?

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  5. I just went through a family crisis, and I need riveting, but noto brutal books to immerse myself in. (A relative was missing for a month, was just found.)
    So any suggestions would help. I'm ready to read about thinking dogs at this point.

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    1. If you're ready to read about thinking dogs, try Spencer Quinn's Chet and Bernie series. I think Quinn does an excellent job in writing how a dog would think.

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  6. I have read one Chet and Bernie book, recommended here. I enjoyed it at a time I needed it. I got such a kick out of how Chet always thought of food when visiting various people, just like a real dog.

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  7. Should Magpie Murders be read first?

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    1. Since I haven't read Moonflower Murders, it's difficult to say. It's usually a good idea to start with the first one in order to get a feel for the characters.

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  8. Sounds very intriguing, Cathy! Thank you for the heads up!

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  9. Whoops! First time commenter above. Maureen M.

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    1. Thanks for the ID, and thanks for stopping by!

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