Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Come Browse My TBR Shelves-- Bookcase #4


The powers-that-be seem to want to reopen everything and return to normal. I think "normal" has deserted us for the time being, and pardon me if I err on the side of caution. There are too many people roaming around who seem to think that they never get sick, so they should be allowed to do whatever they feel like doing. I certainly hope their assumptions are correct; however, you and I both know what can happen when one assumes.

But what better way to pass the time than by looking at someone's bookshelves? In this instance, I'm the someone and the bookcases are my To-Be-Read (TBR) shelves. I have five bookcases devoted to my TBR books, and we've been going through them one at a time. If you've missed any of the installments, here is bookcase one, bookcase two, and bookcase three.

I've purposely left all the file sizes large so you'll be able to manipulate them to see all the book titles. If you're having trouble with any of them, just ask for more information in the comments section. (That's why I've numbered all the shelves.)

Now it's time to take a look at those shelves!


Shelf #1-- from Stuart MacBride to Val McDermid


Shelf #2-- from David McCallum to Amy Myers


Shelf #3-- from Magdalen Nabb to Matthew Pearl


Shelf #4-- from Justine Picardie to Michael Robotham


Did you see any old friends? How about ones you'd like to make the acquaintance of? Inquiring minds would love to know!


11 comments:

  1. I love your shelfies, Cathy! That is all. Well, not quite all. You've reminded me that I want to read the Denise Mina I saw, and the Nele Neuhaus. I saw that you have a Ngaio Marsh, too, and I've always thought she wrote some fine books. And Michael Robotham has done some truly fine work, too. Can I just, like, crawl into your bookshelves and live there?

    Oh, and about relaxing the pandemic rules? I'll be honest. I've had a lot of conversations with medical people lately. Every one of them believes that we must tread very cautiously. Here are a few things they've said about it: it's far too soon to reopen; testing should be much more widely and easily available; we all need to observe mask/handwashing/social distance protocols, at least for now. I don't want to drone on, but these are people at a hospital that has some 'Covid floors,' and they see how the virus works, how it passes around, and so on. So I'm inclined to take them seriously. My heart breaks - it really does - for those who've lost their jobs and whose businesses can't open As a writer, I lost all of the 'oomph' for my book release (it happened in March) because of the virus. And my sales show it. But honestly, we cannot be cavalier about this.

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    1. No, we cannot. We Americans have been living high off the hog for decades. We don't have any memory of diseases like polio. For many of us, it's all about what we want and when we want it. "We're all in this together" has no real meaning for people such as this.

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  2. I love these posts! Just being able to virtually look at your bookshelves is fun for me. I see a few that I recognize and have meant to try. Oh, and do you mean you haven't read that Margaret Maron book? I've read all the Deborah Knott books and some of her Sigrid Harald books as well. I was so excited when I got to meet Margaret at Malice Domestic a couple of years ago.

    The reopening and ongoing controversies just make me upset. I wrote a whole bunch here and then erased it. I need to hide my head in books again.

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    1. No, I haven't read that Maron book. Shameful, I know. I read some Sigrid Harald and didn't particularly care for it. I read The Bootlegger's Daughter and liked it, but that was years ago, so it's rather obvious that, although I did like it, it didn't exactly light a fire under me to read more books in the series. Southern Discomfort is biding its time. I'll get there sooner or later! LOL

      You should've left your thoughts about reopening uncensored. I would've loved to have read them. I know I'm too wary about offending others here on my blog, but every once in a while, I have to let fly with an opinion or two.

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  3. Thank you again for sharing your shelves! I'm excited to see the Eliot Pattison books, which are quite good. Have you read The Skull Mantra, which is the first in that series?

    And I am another one who's taking the extremely cautious approach to activities these days, continuing protocols even if those around me are loosening up. As with Margot's experience, medical professionals I know are indicating that more caution is needed, and I am willing to listen to them.

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    1. I'm willing to listen to them, too, Kate. And yes, I have read The Skull Mantra, which is what "twisted my arm" to obtain the next books in the series. My poor arm!

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  4. I wish people would listen to the public health officials, scientists, doctors. They know more than politicians do. And since I'm older than many people I know, I will say I remember childhood diseases as I had four of them. So glad there are vaccines for them. And for polio.
    I had a friend who just passed away at age 99, but she had polio as a child and she was disabled, more so as she aged. She was the most pro-vaccine person one could meet. And I know a woman my age who had polio as a baby in Sicily. She is disabled and proud, she says.
    When I meet neighbors who are anti-vaccine, who did not have childhood diseases because they had vaccines -- and I did suffer through them -- I want to scream. They don't really want their children to go through what I or other children did. People have to think about other adults and children, too.

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    1. I had chicken pox, mumps, and just about every kind of measles there was. Miserable, and we should never allow all those diseases to become commonplace again!

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  5. No. We shouldn't. I had horrible measles and chicken pox. Mumps were tolerable but can be bad for adult men. But children still die of measlres where vaccinations aren't available everywhere. Unnecessary.

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  6. Thanks for the tour! I started with five, then went back to one through four so this is my last one. I loved it, so I'm going to read a book! Really impressive organization and I know how hard it is to photograph shiny book covers. Good job!

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    1. Thanks, Teresa! I'm glad you stopped by to take a look.

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Thank you for taking the time to make a comment. I really appreciate it!