Sunday, April 10, 2022

March 2022 Additions to My Digital Security Blanket

 


I've been needing to take my mind off what's going on around here in Casa Kittling, and one of the ways I do this (besides read and knit) is to keep an eye on my reading wishlist. Good gravy, did I ever fall down the rabbit hole this past month! It seems that, every time I turned around, there were huge price reductions on eBooks and audiobooks that I'd been keeping an eye on, and with a substantial gift card balance available, I went to town.

I dunno. There's just something comforting about buying books-- even if it may take me years to read them. 

I've grouped my purchases according to genre/subgenre, and if you click on the links in the book titles, you will be taken to Amazon US to learn more about the book. Am I affiliated with Amazon? Nope. I just spend money there and use it as an occasional showroom.

I've already warned you, so sit back and take a look at this long list. Perhaps you'll find something you want to read... or something you've already read. 


===Thriller===

AUDIO: The Pact by Sharon Bolton. Set in England.
 
I've really enjoyed the books by Bolton that I've read, and with the price on this one (and its description), I couldn't resist!

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite. Set in Ghana.
 
I liked the different take on the serial killer theme, the different setting, and the price. I'm looking forward to reading it.

AUDIO: Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro. Set in England.
 
I read some reviews on other blogs that fired up my curiosity, and the price was right. At the moment, I'm about halfway through listening to it, and I'm struggling. Part of the struggle is me not wanting to listen to something that may make me miss a call for help from another part of the house, but the lion's share is the story itself.

AUDIO: The Stolen Hours by Allen Eskens. Set in Minnesota. 

I love this man's writing. 'nuff said!
 
 
===Police Procedural===
 
The Madness of Crowds by Louise Penny. Set in Canada.
 
I used to read all of Penny's books. I can't remember the book that didn't set well with me, but it's been a while since I've been to Three Pines. The price was right, and I'm curious to see Penny's take on the pandemic.
 
Water's Edge by G.R. Jordan. Set in Scotland.
 
I am a sucker for crime fiction set in the Highlands and Islands of Scotland, which is where this book is set, and... the price was right...
 
 
===Amateur Sleuth===
 
Canticle Creek by Adrian Hyland. Set in Australia.
 
When I saw a review of this book on an Australian blog (Kerrie's Mysteries in Paradise), I couldn't believe my eyes. In 2006 and 2010, Hyland wrote two books set in the Australian Outback featuring Emily Tempest that I absolutely loved, but I hadn't seen anything from him since then. After reading Kerrie's review, I immediately purchased it for myself.
 
The Maid by Nita Prose.
 
I've been intrigued by this since I first read about it. When this relatively new book went on sale, I was surprised... but not too surprised to buy it.
 
The Verifiers by Jane Pek. Set in New York City.
 
Another book that intrigued me into buying it.
 
The Jean Harlow Bombshell by Mollie Cox Bryan.
 
I've enjoyed the cozies I've read by Bryan, and since I have a weakness for Old Hollywood, and... the price was right...
 
 
===Non-Fiction===
 
 
So far this year, I seem to be having a tendency to read non-fiction that's making me angry, and this book will probably follow that path, but I couldn't resist.
 
AUDIO: The Journey of Crazy Horse by Joseph M. Marshall III.
 
Native American history has always interested me, and I've had my eye on this book for a while. I decided to go with the audio version, not only because it was on sale, but because it is narrated by the author, and I'm looking forward to listening to the Native American cadence in his speech.
 
AUDIO: Island of the Lost by Joan Druett. Set in New Zealand.
 
Druett is a longtime favorite author of mine. I love her maritime histories as well as the historical mystery series she wrote. Fantastic sale price, so you know what happened.
 
 
Three reasons for this purchase. One, I'd never heard of this kidnap, and two, a branch of my family followed Daniel Boone to Kentucky, so there's a personal interest. You know what the third reason was.
 
 
I'd come across mention of this tiger a few times in my reading, but I think I always believed it was a gross exaggeration. It would appear that it's not, so I want to know the particulars.
 
 
===Historical Fiction===
 
Her Hidden Genius by Marie Benedict. Set in England.
 
I remember riding the streets of Cambridge, England in a doubledecker bus and being thrilled that I was in the town where DNA was discovered (among other thrills). Sometime after that, I learned that Wilkins, Watson, and Crick actually stole the work of Rosalind Franklin. I was not pleased, and I want to read about the real discoverer.

AUDIO: This Tender Land by William Kent Krueger.
 
I loved Ordinary Grace, and I'm looking forward to listening to this one. (I still can't believe the sale Audible had. Wow!)
 
AUDIO: Shogun by James Clavell. Set in Japan.
 
I read this years ago, loved it, watched the miniseries starring Richard Chamberlain, loved that, too. I'm in the mood for a return trip to 17th-century Japan.
 
 
===Cozy Mystery===
 
Dial A for Aunties by Jesse Q. Sutanto. Set in California.
 
I read some rave reviews on blogs, and the price was right. The rest is history.
 
 
===Short Story===
 
Zikora by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Set in Washington, DC.
 
I feel the need to add more color to the authors that I read, and I've found that one of the best ways to try new reading material is through short stories.
 
A Face in the Crowd by Stephen King and Stewart O'Nan. Set in Massachusetts.
 
I'm beginning to gather a small collection of Stephen King stories. I've liked that man's "voice" since I read his very first book many, many, many moons ago. It sometimes feels as though he's stolen the thoughts right out of my head. You know, the ones you never share with anyone else?
 
Witness to a Trial by John Grisham.
 
When Grisham was first published, I read The Firm, went back for A Time to Kill, and read three or four others, all of which I enjoyed. Then I stopped reading him. I'm not sure why. I rated this story three stars on Goodreads.
 
 
===Fiction===
 
Some People Talk With God by John Enright. Set in New York.
 
I fell in love with Enright's storytelling ability and his poetic language through the mystery series he wrote set in American Samoa. I've had my eye on this one for a while, and when the price plummeted, I grabbed it fast.
 
 
===Historical Mystery===
 
Murder on the Red River by Marcie R. Rendon. Set in North Dakota and Minnesota.
 
I came across this series set in 1970 that features 19-year-old Native American Cash Blackbear, and I had a feeling that I had to read it, especially since it is written by a Native American woman. I just finished this book, and you'll be reading my review of it in a few days. It made my Best Reads of 2022 list, and I'll be grabbing the others.  


See what I mean about falling down the rabbit hole? Wow! 

Did I buy any books that you want to read? Which ones? And... did I choose any that you've already read? Chime in with your valued recommendations!




16 comments:

  1. That's a nice set of reads there, Cathy. I've been wanting to read My Sister the Serial Killer, and I'll be interested in what you think of it. And a Louise Penny novel is almost never a disappointment; I hope you'll like this one!

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  2. You sure did fall down a rabbit hole! But, I tend to agree with you that there's something comforting about buying books. Enjoy!

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  3. Buying books is always comforting. That, with chocolate, are my go-to's whenever I need a diveersion, distraction, virtual travel and entertainment.
    You have chosen some very good books, several of which I had written down to read. Now I will make a list from your list.
    I liked My Sister, the Serial Killer; it is different from books I usually read.
    I also love Allen Eskens. I have to make a list and then return here. I
    have heard of several also which I was thinking about.
    Too bad the cries for help continue. I hope that Denis gets better soon.

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    Replies
    1. I hope he does, too. He has another doctor's appointment to endure Tuesday afternoon after the visiting infusion nurse gets done with him.

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  4. That's quite a list! I've read Island of the Lost (and keep meaning to read more by Druett), and forget how I stumbled upon No Beast So Fierce, which is a fascinating story, all the more so because it's true.

    I'm another reader who's interested in My Sister the Serial Killer, and I'll be checking out Adrian Hyland and Marcie Rendon after your comments here. And looking forward to reviews of some of these!

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    Replies
    1. Almost sounds as though you may join me down in my rabbit hole. ;-)

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  5. And Adrian Hyland has a new work of fiction! I have to read it.
    So many titles are jumping out at me.
    The Verifiers is on other lists, so I've read about it.
    Someone at the PP just mentioned A is for Aunties.

    Etc., etc. So many good titles here. I feel the urge to
    spend money, but I try to stick to the library. But it's
    April and spring is here. Why not stretch the budget?

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  6. Oh, my gosh, even more: Zikora, Murder on the Red River, etc. I hope no one wants me to take my head out of a book for three months so I can read these books.

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    Replies
    1. Sounds like you need a good guard dog to chase unwelcome interruptions away.

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  7. Or a block on my phone and email.
    On to good reading for you and hopes that Denis improves.
    I've already started listing books from this list. I know
    of many. I look forward to your reviews, realizing that you
    have a lot to do on the home front.

    I think I actually got high when I saw this list as so many
    books I've noticed (and not listed) are right here, waiting
    for me to write them down.

    And the budget? Who needs dental work anyway? Especially
    with no dogs there?

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    Replies
    1. I really need to go to the dentist, but my beloved dentist retired, blast it, and the people who took over his practice treat us like walking wallets instead of human beings. I've got to find a new one.

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  8. I stopped seeing a dentist for two reasons: Too far during the pandemic. Wanted one in walking distance. And I saw her verbally mistreat two of the employees, one of whom keeps that office going.
    So I asked friends for suggestions and found a dentist six blocks from my building. And now that I'm aware of all of the dental work ahead, I'm stretching it out, still recovering from a) extractions and b) the cost.

    Now if I could only pay her in books!

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