Sunday, October 31, 2021

October 2021 Additions to My Digital Security Blanket

 


When you see the list of books that I couldn't resist during the month of October, I think you're going to be shocked: only seven. SEVEN! Yes, I do seem to have exercised some form of restraint, although I must be honest and admit that it wasn't a conscious choice. It seems that having major work done on two bathrooms simultaneously tends to keep a person distracted.

The major remodeling of the guest bath is almost complete. I've taken my measurements and ordered new towels, rugs, etc. It won't be long before I'm taking the official After photos so you all can see the transformation. But I digress.

I've grouped my acquisitions by genre/subgenre, and if you click on the link in the book title, you'll be taken to Amazon where you can learn more about the book.

Let's see what I couldn't resist amidst all the demo and drywall!


===Thriller===

Lone Jack Trail by Owen Laukkanen. Set in Washington. I read the first book in the series (Deception Cove) and really liked it, so when the price was right on this one, I snapped it up.

 
===Non-Fiction===

The Indomitable Florence Finch: The Untold Story of a War Widow Turned Reistance Fighter and Savior of American POWs by Robert J. Mrazek. Set in the Philippines. Jen brought this book to my attention on her blog, A Garden Carried in the Pocket, so when the price was right, you know what happened!


===Historical Mystery===

AUDIO: The Fatal Flying Affair by T.E. Kinsey. Set in England. I already have this on my Kindle, but a screamin' deal on the audiobook version persuaded me that I needed to listen to it. I really enjoy the wit and humor of this series.

Christmas at Ferndean Manor by Joanna Campbell Slan. Set in England. This is the third and last in the Jane Eyre Chronicles series by Joanna Campbell Slan. I've enjoyed the other two, so when the price came down... (I'm so predictable!)

The House on Vesper Sands by Paraic O'Donnell. Set in England. This is one of those books whose synopsis intrigued me. Then the price came down... (Am I beginning to sound like a cheapskate?)


===Police Procedural===

The Comfort of Distance by Ryburn Dobbs. Set in South Dakota. Amazon found this one for me. Between the synopsis and the price... Yada, yada, yada. I will say that this one has my favorite cover. It makes me want to yell, "Road trip!" and throw provisions in the back of the Jeep.


===Short Story===

The Last Line by Robert Dugoni. Set in Washington. A favorite author, and a short story providing more background on a couple of secondary characters in his Tracy Crosswhite series. What's not to like?


 
Well, that was it for the month of October. Have you read any of these... or did you add any of these to your own wishlists? Which ones? Inquiring minds would love to know!



18 comments:

  1. The Mrazek sounds great, Cathy! I'm always especially drawn to those stories of people who don't usually read about in the history books, but who made a real difference. The rest of your acquisitions look good, too, and I like the variety.

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    1. We're seeing more and more books about forgotten historical figures who made a difference, and I'm glad.

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  2. I really liked The Indomitable Florence Finch! I do hope you like it as well. I'm interested in The House on Vesper Sands, Lonesome Jack Trail, and The Comfort of Distance.
    Talking about cheap, that is what the library and NetGalley offer me. I'm always reading, and there is no way I could afford all the books I want. Nonfiction I often purchase and keep, but most fiction makes its way to two Little Free Libraries and the annual Centenary College Book sale. Even with the majority of my reading on Kindle now, I always have a box of books on the stairs ready to donate.

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    1. I get quite a bit of use from Net Galley, too. Sometimes I feel guilty about not using the library, but I just don't want to deal with due dates or possibly keeping someone else from reading a book they've been waiting for. Besides, being a buyer-- even though I tend to be a cheapskate buyer-- helps authors, right?

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  3. I have not read any of these, but The Indomitable Florence Finch sounds fascinating. Enjoy your reads!

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  4. I have The House on Vesper Sands on The List - I'm interested in your thoughts if you read it first. The List also shows that I'm interested in the first book in Laukkanen's series - I appreciate the reminder. And I hadn't previously seen anything about Florence Finch, and will take a closer look at that one, since the Philippines is a change from the European theater that's getting more than its share of attention (at least in my opinion).

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    1. Yes! I like it when WWII books are set in other places besides Europe, probably because my grandfather was fighting in the Pacific theater. There was even a man in my little hometown who survived the Bataan Death March.

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  5. A few catch my eye, and I am reminded to read a Dugoni and to watch him at the PP.
    Have had too much to write and TV news to watch to spent time reading mysteries. And I am suffering withdrawal symptoms.

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    1. Hopefully your workload will let up soon so you can dive back into mystery reading.

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  6. The only one I have is the Robert Dugoni one, and I haven't read it yet even though I'm a big fan of his. Reading The Silent Sisters right now, in fact...number three in the Charles Jenkins series.

    Your e-book library must be massive.

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    1. It's probably 400-600 books right now. With the eye problems I've had in the past couple of years, I just can't beat my Kindle for ease of reading and convenience.

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  7. Good to know. I may have to get a Kindle.
    Right now I use my library Overdrive system sometimes, as the font is huge.
    But sometimes leaning over to the laptop is a pain.

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    1. With a Kindle or any other type of eReader, you can get in any position you please. Another bonus!

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  8. Absolutely a boon. And one can adjust the font. And also, stock up on books.

    Also, this laptop is partially broken. I used to put it on the bed near me and read it. I can't do that now. A kind bro-in-law bought me a new TV and laptop (and router and extender) for a big birthday. I need a tech person to install all the computer stuff.

    I had enough problems adjusting the TV which has enough things to adjust it looks like a jet plane dashboard. It took me awhile to adjust the crazy neon colors on the screen. Then all people looked yellow. Took awhile, but now it's near normal.

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    1. Some of these things are tough for us novices. I'm lucky. Denis can almost always figure this stuff out if there's a problem.

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  9. Lucky to have live-in tech help.

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