Thursday, September 09, 2021

The I've Got a Handle on It Weekly Link Round-Up


I haven't said much about my leg lately, not because it's completely healed, but because I've got a handle on how to deal with it and still be able to get out and do things. This may be something I have to do the rest of my life, but as long as I can maintain an acceptable status quo and be able to get out and do the things I want to do, I can live with it. It's true that you have to play the hand of cards you're dealt, and I'm determined to at least come to a draw if I can't out-and-out win. 

This is a photo that Denis climbed the Grand Gallery stairs in the Heard Museum to take. It's a huge Navajo rug that covers a big chunk of the floor in the room.

Gorgeous, isn't it?

As big as it is, it is dwarfed by the Hubbell Rug, the world's largest Navajo rug at 26 ft. by 36 ft. I learned about the Hubbell Rug from La Posada Hotel's Facebook page. If you're on Facebook, you can check out these posts, one showing the rug only one-quarter unfolded, the other with the rug completely unfolded. It is very seldom ever displayed because it's difficult to find a place large enough.

Speaking of La Posada, it is my aim to spend at least one night there. La Posada is an old Fred Harvey House hotel built to service all the railroad passengers traveling through the United States from the 1870s through the 1950s. (Its history is fascinating.) La Posada is situated not only right by the train tracks (you can spend the night and then board the train to Chicago), but on Route 66 as well. A lot of famous people stayed there in its heyday. Denis and I wandered through both the hotel and its grounds shortly after its new owners began restoring it, and they've done so much in the ensuing years. Perhaps Denis and I can stay in the John Wayne Room, or the Howard Hughes Room, or...

Sounds as if travel plans might be in our future, but who knows what the future will bring? While I'm daydreaming, please enjoy the links!


 ►Books & Other Interesting Tidbits◄
 
►Channeling My Inner Indiana Jones◄
 
►Channeling My Inner Elly Mae Clampett◄
 
►The Wanderer◄
 
►Fascinating Folk◄
 
►I ♥ Lists◄

That's all for this week! Don't forget to stop by next Friday when I'll be sharing a freshly selected batch of links for your surfing pleasure.

Stay safe. Stay healthy. And don't forget to curl up with a good book!

22 comments:

  1. That rug is gorgeous, Cathy! Thanks for showing it to us. And I'm really happy to hear that you are finding ways to live the life you want to live despite your leg. Being able to get around, and do what you want to do makes so much difference, doesn't it? Thanks also, as ever, for the links. I'm off to that WWII bunker, myself, but there's a lot of other great stuff to explore, too, and I'm grateful.

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    1. Yes, that rug is gorgeous, and one of these days, I'd like to see the Hubbell Rug. La Posada is trying to work out a way to display it.

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  2. What a great picture of the rug, Cathy! Glad Denis made the 'climb' for us. And glad you're working out how to deal with your leg and still do things. Good for you! Hope you have a good weekend!

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    1. You, too, Kay! I'm itching to do some improvements on the house, but with everything I keep hearing, I'm making myself put it off. *sigh*

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  3. I appreciate your positive attitude, Cathy! It's true we have to play with the hand we are dealt. I'm glad you have figured out how to deal with your leg and still do what you want to do.

    That rug is gorgeous. Kudos to Denis for making the climb.

    I'm off to check out several links...

    Have a good weekend!

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  4. We've actually been to some of those least-visited national park. It's always a treat to find a park that isn't completely overrun by people.

    That rug is just gorgeous. I'm always fascinated by the patterns the Navajos use in their rugs and the symbolism of them.

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    1. I know exactly what you mean about the least-visited parks. It's one of the reasons why I recommend going to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon if at all possible. Much, much, much less crowded, even more beautiful, and more than worth the extra time and effort it takes to get there.

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  5. The more I learn about octopi, the more I like them!

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  6. Your Friday links always end up taking up a ton of my time...and that's a GOOD thing. This week is no exception. But first I have to say that the Navajo rug pictured is spectacular. It looks large in the photo, but I can imagine how huge it must be in "real life."

    I've only made it a couple of links down so far, but I want to stop and say how much that Libby app has meant to me in the last couple of years. It was truly a lifesaver during the worst of the pandemic.

    But libraries and publishers are going to have to get this thing about e-book pricing for libraries figured out soon if we are to continue to enjoy that kind of service from our local libraries. Mine is a large county system, but I can't imagine how small town libraries could afford to pay those prices. It seems that the answer around here is for all libraries of any size, type, or affiliation to share books with each other's patrons. That's working for now, at least, but I have to wonder how long even that can go on.

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    1. I certainly agree with you about the eBook pricing for libraries, Sam.

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  7. Beautiful rug, and thanks to Denis for getting a photo of it.

    And am very glad you are getting around to do some of your favorite things and see some of your favorite artifacts and crafts and critters. And then letting us in on seeing them, too, is great.

    I just finished Clark and Division and post good book slump is starting. I hope Naomi Hirahara wrotes more about Aki Ito. A great sleuth and such a winning character. And a reader learns so much about how Japanese people were treated or rather mistreated.


    I read a book by Nina Revoyr, and in it, the main character, an Issei, born in Japan, and living in California, was denied acting roles and going to clubs and more and that was around WWI.

    So I'll see if I can get into Chris Whitaker's book or do the Times crossword puzzle.

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    1. It shouldn't take much effort for you to get into Whitaker's book. I hope you enjoy it half as much as I did.

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  8. And a daunting, but possibly good thing is that the Rap Sheet lists 425 crime books, some nonfiction, are coming out in the next four months!

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    1. as Martha Stewart would say, "It's a good thing."

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  9. But overwhelming. How does one decide? One reads blogs and book reviews.

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  10. Yes, I started reading Whitaker's book and teared up for the first few chapters, and wondered how this was going to go. But it's OK.
    It reminds me of Tana French's "The Searcher," and a bit about Scout in "To Kill a Mockingbird."

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  11. Yes. I do like We Begin at the End. A bit more than halfway through it and like the characters, although much of it is painful to read about. Lots of waterworks here. But the dialogue is good and so is the story, landscape descriptions, human relations.

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Thank you for taking the time to make a comment. I really appreciate it!