Sunday, September 12, 2021

A Visit to the Heard Museum: Navajo Weaving

A visit to the Heard Museum here in Phoenix, Arizona can take a long time because there's so much to see. Denis and I had to go back because we'd missed one of the exhibits I'd most wanted to see, and it's scheduled to end soon. Can't have that!

The following photographs show both the room the exhibit is housed in as well as the works of art themselves. Photos marked with *db* were taken by my husband Denis.
 
 

As you enter the Jacobson Gallery.



I loved seeing these photographs of the weavers with their creations.

This sign made me chuckle. (And yes, I obeyed it!)

 
The following photos show some of my favorites in the exhibition. I tend to like the more traditional designs although some of the modern ones were striking. The file sizes are large in order for you to see more detail if you wish.


Artist: Lynda Teller Pete

Artist: Lena Tahe

Artist: Michele Laughing-Reeves.

This reminds me of the day Denis and I spent in Canyon de Chelly, and I stood at the base of Spider Woman, the towering rock formation you see above.


Artist: Louise Y. Nez

Artist: Elsie Bia

Artist: Christine Chischilly  *db*

Artist: Rena Yazzie  *db*

Artist: Stella Nockideneh  *db*

Artist: Marietta White  *db*

 
I hope you enjoyed this little tour of treasures. Besides spending a day in Canyon de Chelly, Denis and I also spent the day touring Monument Valley with another Navajo tour guide. (The only way you will get inside both Canyon de Chelly and Monument Valley, by the way.) One of the stops was to visit a hogan and watch while a Navajo woman worked on her weaving. I treasure these memories.

I may post a random photo or two from the Heard Museum in the future, but I only have one more full-blown post in the works from there. I'm saving what's, to me, the best for the last: an exhibit on Plains Indian dolls. You won't believe the workmanship and the beauty. Stay tuned!

16 comments:

  1. I love that social distancing sign, Cathy! How clever! And those rugs are breathtaking. It always amazes me how much careful and painstaking work goes into an everyday something like a rug. There's so much beauty and creativity there! I'm glad you were able to get out and see it.

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    1. It always amazes me that signs like that have to be put up. It would never occur to me to touch works of art. For one thing, they don't belong to me!

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  2. How beautiful are those tapestries, woven art. I like them all.

    How good that both of you were able to go to this exhibit before it leaves.

    My family members, older generations, liked Native artwork of all kinds, and books about it. And I like it all.

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    1. Their artistry, like so much of the landscape they live in, is breathtaking.

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  3. Thank you for sharing these beautiful examples of Navajo weaving. I wish I could see them in person, but since I can't, I'm glad that you did.

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  4. Those are absolutely beautiful works of art. I love the style and the colors and the way that the works represent so well the culture that produced them. In a way, they remind me of the rugs I saw in Algeria, especially those produced by the desert tribes living in and around the Sahara...especially the colors.

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    1. I love how so much of a culture can be woven into rugs.

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  5. These are so amazing...and so beautiful! Thanks for sharing. :D

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  6. Those tapestries are amazing! I love how they have them displayed on a white wall. It makes them stand out so much more. I really like the photo of the artists with their work too.

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    1. Yes, I think any other color on the wall would have detracted from the weaving.

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  7. Beautiful - thank you for sharing! I enjoyed the shot with the artists and their rugs as well as the others. Looking forward to the upcoming post you mentioned :)

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    1. I wish I could sneak that entire exhibit out of the Heard and into my house. I fell in love, and maybe you will, too, when you get a chance to see what I'm talking about.

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  8. Such gorgeous rugs! Truly worth their places in the museum!

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